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eing such a recognizable animal, the image of a giraffe can instantly conjure sentiments of African sunsets, untouched wilderness and the serenity of nature within the minds of viewers of all ages. It’s silhouette is both unmistakable and evocative, and is used around the world in advertising to sell a wide range of goods. It has even been used as a logo for the Olympic Games and football’s FIFA World Cup. Few travel operators or safari brochures fail to include the giraffe when they market Africa as an exciting travel destination, and the species is a must-see on every safari-goer’s wish list. Unlike Africa’s Big Five – the elephant, buffalo, rhino, lion and leopard – the giraffe is not in demand as a trophy so revenue from legal hunting is limited. But the giraffe, like the elephant and rhino, is an agent of change in habitats and landscapes. Yet how can it be that the majority of the world is oblivious to the giraffe’s fight against extinction?